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Marriage Adventures: 4 Lessons I Learned From Climbing A Mountain

 

Yesterday, I climbed to the highest point of elevation in my life. (7500 feet) Yes, by foot, up a mountain. Who would have thought that after so many years of being together and growing together, I would have such an impeccable bonding experience with my husband?

There are a few parallels of our relationship + the task of climbing this mountain and making our way down.

 

The Mountain

1. The start was easy.

 

Since we were in Denver the day before, the difference in Elevation didn’t seem to be doing too much damage. But when it got a little tough, we just sat down for a few, caught our breaths, chatted for a bit, and continued on our way to the top. (8500 feet)

 

2. The real hike starts here.

 

The further we made it up the mountain, the harder it was to decide to keep on going. When you’re tired and see what you’ve really gotten yourself into, you get defeated & wanna quit! But, instead of continuing to complain about this hike, I began to keep my complaints to myself. No more stopping and sitting down for a few, catching a breath, or chatting it through.

 

What made me tired & feel like giving up wasn’t affecting Franklin, but we were both feeling the effects of our environment differently. But we had this common goal and only one way to get there. Continue this treacherous hike up. It was getting serious.

 

We had gotten to a point to where I was sitting on the side of the mountain while Franklin was capturing footage with his drone.

 

We had just decided that this was where we were giving up. We weren’t making it any further up this mountain.

 

Then a man (who happened to be from Dallas) was on his way from the very top of the mountain. We talked to him for about five minutes and he told us we were almost to the halfway mark and that we should keep going! This was just what we needed. We decided to continue up the mountain.

 

When it got a little tough, we just sat down for a few, caught our breaths, chatted for a bit, and continued on our way to our new destination, halfway up this 2000 foot incline.

 

3. The hike down is a bonding experience.

 

After all the great conversation and unforgettable views, we were suddenly out of time. The moment for us to end our journey had come. People always say that it’s easier to go down than it is to come up. That the higher you go, the tougher the climb. This is true.

 

On the way down, we were both tired and a tad frustrated, knowing that we were once strong enough to conquer this mountain, but now my legs were giving way and time was not on our side.

 

Franklin fell in the rocks on the side of the stairs.

 

I fell DOWN the stairs.

 

But we were right there to pick each other up.

 

When we were finally done falling and a third of the way down, we held each other’s hands, while taking a minute to catch our breaths periodically, all the way down to our destination at the bottom of the incline.

 

4. We were joyful about everything in the end.

 

Though we didn’t make it to the top, nor see everything we wanted to see, nor capture every shot we wanted to capture, looking back on everything, we wouldn’t change a thing. We literally felt our capacity increasing the more we hyped each other up.

 

The Marriage

1. The start was easy.

 

We met when I was just 19 years old and we were friends for almost a year before starting our relationship. In our relationship, we never really argued, but when we had disagreements, we just sat down for a few, caught our breaths, chatted for a bit and continued on our way.

 

2. The real hike starts here.

 

This is the part of our relationship where things got serious (where we had to decide if we were really in this or not) all the way up to where we are in our marriage now.

 

There were times early in our relationship that one of us did not want to share our frustrations. We soon learned that communicating and keeping everything out in the open and in the forefront would tremendously help our marriage.

 

We learned which concerns needed to be addressed with the other person and which ones just needed to be given to God.

 

The higher the two of us got in our lives & our career, the tougher our marriage (hike) began to be. But we’re rolling with the punches and growing closer together every day.

We both experienced losses that changed us forever. One of which had the potential to completely alter the environment of our marriage because of how my grief affected me. But the more we progressed in our marriage, the more we talked to each other, the more we brought God into our relationship, the more He revealed His love for us. The more He revealed His plans for us. The more He revealed HIMSELF to us.

 

So we packed up our worries, trusted God with our tears, and continued on our way to our new destination: a long, happy, and successful marriage where we choose to be in it wholeheartedly. Daily.

 

Here we learned how much work marriage is.

 

3. The hike down is a bonding experience.

 

We haven’t reached this point of our lives, but this part represents that latter part of our life together.

 

We know that after all the great conversation, unforgettable views, and memories with the family we plan to build someday, we will suddenly be out of time.

 

The moment for us to end our journey will come.

 

We know that one day we’ll probably be frustrated that our once strong legs and sharp eyes will begin to fail us. But when we are old together, I hope we can look back on the many adventures like the one we took in Colorado this week.

 

That we’ll remember all the ups and downs, gains and losses, successes and failures, births of our children and memories of the family and friends who left before us. That we’ll keep helping one another up when the other falls. That we’ll never stop holding hands, not only on the inclines but on the hike back down as well.

 

4. We were joyful about everything in the end.

 

Though we may not make it to the top, nor see everything we wanted to see, nor capture every shot we wanted to capture, build everything we wanted to build, looking back on everything, we don’t want to change a thing.

We were exactly where we were supposed to be.

 

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